Hashing It Out
Hashing It Out

Episode 106 · 2 months ago

Hashing It Out #106-SuperRare NFT Marketplace

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Today, Corey and Jaye talk with Ryan Collins from SuperRare, an NFT platform that gives continuous royalties to the artists that create them as they're traded throughout the market place. We go into how it works, how it differentiates itself, where they're at, where they're going, and much more! Enjoy

LINKS:

- Website: https://superrare.com 

- Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuperRare 

- Ryan's Twitter: https://twitter.com/rymcol 

Welcome to hashing it out a podcast,for we talk to the tech, innovators, behind blocked in infrastructure anddecentralized networks. We dive into the weeds to get at why and how peoplebuild this technology. The problems they face along the way come, listenand learn from the best in the business you can join our ranks. Welcome back everybody episode, one ofsix passing it out is always on your host talk to cort pet today. My GOES TOBE J she's from Quintet, always helping out and wonderful, say, hello, J, Helloas morning, I'm doing well. Today's guests, RyanCollins from super rare ringed FT platform that I've known himout for a long time, Colin Right Brian. What are you do? Thenormal saying give us a crins, quick introduction as to like how you gotinto this face and what super variis sure thanks core. Thank you for havingme on the PODCAST, I'm happy to be here. So I have a bit of a weird weirdbackground. I started in the server administration world and I became more quickly interested in actuallydeveloping things and I got into front and software development. Then I got upinto back and software development, mobile development and I kind ofevolved from there and then I started working in the ops world after I took afew CT roles and that type of thing, because I kind of when you, when you haveexperience and all of the above, it's just kind of the natural world to go to- and I ended up running Dev saccus for a German- do anything on the blockchainstart up that pivoted into a real estate asset Tocantins, start up, whichthen pivoted into securities brokerage, which was an interesting ride. Andafter that I ended up at that Super Rar. My official title right now is the headof SRE, but I still handle all of the like Deve Sec, ob style things tobecause it's a very small team. What about Super Rar so like what islike to give us a like elevator pitch of super rare and thenalso like ill there pitch of how it differentiates itself from like themyriad of infty platform you can find today, yeah so and I'll tell you from my perspectiveto- and this is like my personal opinion as well, but when I met superare so. I had been tracking the space for a little bit because I was alreadyworking in block chain and I actually knew an n ft are a talented n FT artistfrom one of my former jobs and when I met them, it was basically likea really differentiated them. For me was that they cared about the artistlike everything's, very artist focused and collector focused, and it wasn'tcorporate deal money making focused. You know, there's a lot of focus on,like the wonder ones, very unique pieces, the they have hierges yeah, but they have ahigh respect for the rarity of the actual pieces and like from myperspective, they were one of them. I would call them the more premiumplatforms that exist, unlike I've, been really happy to to land a position andand started a company that that kept that focus the whole time solike Superos, started by basically three guys in a coffee shop who wereinterested in art and wanted to make a little market. Just you know to dotheir own thing together, and it was. It was the interest in art and theinterest in the technology. That kind of drove that- and I would like, in mywords that I would say they accidentally created a really coolcompany- they've, definitely been around for along time, an e. They were part of the, so they were part of the statusqueprogram which is now currently defunte, but those one of the earliest projectsthat I think we took on to try and like help get boots strapped-and I remember when I was in- I want to say Prague Yeah. We did a hackathon andPrague and was it Prague. I forget it. It'sbeen so long ago and COID has this road and they had this huge like it was. Itwas a really cool building that we did it in and they had this like hugedisplay of all of the NTS and photo frames of like that, like you could seekind of animated him live, it was just really cool to do and it was, as Ithink, one of the earliest ones that I had seen of like actual production andand legit mate product in in a few space.I'm happy to see that they're like...

...still around and on been killing it on. I remember seeing them that veryvery autaco thrust that year, a little bit earlier, as just you know, I thinkwhen I first started seeing them, they were just like a little table thatthey'd set up and like we're doing ftse or whatever you know. I don't thinkanyone really knew, at least from an outside perspective like what it wouldgrow into, and it's grown into like this, like really great project yeah, that the guys there wereoriginally trying to develop a like a market place platform that other peoplecould use to make an FT market places, and then they ended up making their own.As sort of like an example, let's do it, let's see what we can do sort ofproject and that became superber, and that's really what took off, and Ithink it's also a question of good market timing. Like anything else. isthey they just the space started taking off,they had the technology, they already had some of the artist relationshipsand they were kind of courting that and it worked out very well. Can you like? Is there adifferentiating mechanism of the NF market place that that, because I enter my opinion now thatthey're, like the hard part, now, is making sure that artists who would liketo be like a participate in creating an FTARunderst, like figure out where to go and make it like, make it easy for themto on board and get their heart on to a market place, and then a line in sitisin such a way that it they are maximum ly taken care of or like they do getthe benefits associated with the value of their art and one of them.I think I what you have in your fuck play hereis that, like pioneering art markets, royalty so likeartists receive continuous royalties for all secondary sales on their ourwork forever. So like does that mean that if I were an artist on the upload,an aft on to Super Rar, every time that thing getssold, I get a percentage of that sale and like how does the? How ejector doesthat work? That's correct! So, like one of the main different, I mean. That's,that's all smart contract focus on the theory and block chain and you can be a tech as you want. Her is avery technical shop. So like don't you don't don't don't Miswar, so it's anarc, seven twenty one contract and and basically the royalties, are built intothe contract and we actually just recently rolled out collector royaltiesas well at the same purpose, and I think overall, like I forget what the exactpercentages are off the top of my head. But basically, if you, if you mentionartwork on superearthly, gets sold to a collector, you make a prettysignificant chunk of the first sale. Is An artist and then every time thatcollect or sells it to another collector, you do make an additionalroyalty and then collectors who sell resell art can also make additionalroyalties. So you have almost like a cascadingroyalty type thing. The it's was that original or was that royaltymodel, because I know that's that's what the transaction level was, thatpioneer CI super rare. Absolutely, I think that's one of the things thatthey really focused on in the beginning was getting those smart contracts tofocus on for, to focus on not only keeping the rarity and keepingthe quality of the platform up, but really to focus on that that modelwhere artists can be supported for ever based on their art work. You know it'snot it's not! You know it's not the traditional model where you buy a pieceof art from a gallery. Hang it on your wall and, like you have no way to you,know the third or fourth collector down the chain has no way to contact theartist. It's a smart contract and the transactions always taking place onetherium and the smart contracts always handle the percentages, the addressesand everything else involved. So as an artist, I think it's really motivatingto get on to a platform like super rare and to sell there because it's a way toactually build a profitable business for yourself. I have some tetrica questions aroundthat, but I think it's reasonable to start at a high level and anyone who'slistening who isn't technical, can get the most out of this so like. If I were an artist, can you walk methrough the process of just engaging gauging the platform andlike what I can expect and maybe like the time to be, live and doing something yeah? So rightnow, I would say it's a little bit longer than the business would like itto be, but basically you have to fill out a formto express interest, and then the artist lies on table. Take a look atthe artist, their works. What they've done in the past the quality of the youknow the types of things that they produce in that and it's sort of t it'salways been a...

...filter to getting on board to keep outthe riff Raff and the hecklers and the the people who are just looking to mitsuper super simple variations of the same thing over and over and over again,to try and make a quick fuck. It's really more about the art and that andthen once you're an approved artist. You, basically, you can sign in with a a Web, threed, auto wallet right now. Ibelieve ere supporting Fort Matic Metamar and any wallet connect,supportable Wallet we actually rolled wallet, connect, support out recently,which I am personally absolutely stoke about and having a ton of fun withmyself and then that, once you sign into the actualwebsite that gives you the ability to upload art, which we are basicallystoring. On an IPS note, like a salvos that IPS now that in gets distributedout, it's distributed, you don't care that that that inning riffs exact aregoing to go away up and then from there you can. You can set, you know, you're,either your reserve price or you're, asking prices and stuff like that, andthen that all gets put into the smart contract stuff in the back end, andthen it goes out to the the actual market place at large. I would say from what I've seen like:I'm, not an artist on the platform or right now and from what I've seen it'sa pretty good basic user experience for such a new platform that only gainedpopularity in the recent year or two for the art, the actual art curation, were specific galleries, sort of looked at to sort of build thatmodel or was it sort of? Was it more organic like you know, because thesuper gear, definitely as as you say is, is trying to you know, have a particular level of ofart and maintain that that as a collection like it, failsvery much like a collection. When I go to the website, I feel like I am thisis the super rare gallery is how it feels as a com, a UX perspective yeah. I would say that I think therewas a mix of and intentions in or organic stuff and I'll put that withjust a small grain of salt, but I've only been working here for about threemonths now, so I wasn't there at the beginning, and I didn't see theplatform and fall. That's sure. Definitely looking at it. I mean it'syeah, it's very it's I W L. I would call it in its current form, highlycurated, though, as had ever going to change that. Wouldit be something that you probably expand out to like a broader audienceor use. It is the goal to stay relatively curated, or at least like Imean, of course you may shreelane the process of being vetted and being onthe platform. But like is the goal to stay somewhat of a niche like High Quality Art Work Platform? I definitely think the goal is to keepthe rarity the quality of artists, the quality of artwork and stuff, like thatup the the focus on on that is going to be good and, like I don't think,they're going to compromise too much on the aesthetics or anything else in thefuture, but I will say that every platform wants to grow like there hasto be market fit for that there has to be a lot of things and it's a verycareful balance of what the users you know what the userswant with the market at large needs. In order to succeed in like what thecompany needs to be profitable and succeed and stuff, I won't speculate onany like future undecided features or plans, and that kind of thing, but,like I mean superber, is not not going to goanywhere and we are definitely. We definitely have pain, points identifiedand we're definitely working on solutions to those pain points you speak to any of those like whatkind of pain points are you referring to it like? What maybe solutions areyou thinking about? I can't again, I can't speculate toomuch on future features or anything partially, because I'm responsible forthe infrastructure and not notion, I don't. I don't actually write the backin software. What I do is a lot of coordination, security, work and stufflike that, but I think I think that many quality artists in the past haveprobably felt slowed down and annoyed by the process of on boarding, becauseit is so highly curated, and I think there are many other n ft platformsthat have rolled out a wide variety of...

...business models and features veryquickly that you know we're always watching the market too, and I thinkwhat we may. There may be things that people end up.Wanting that the of course, the business team and the tech team willalways consider developing what those actually are. I don't know or or soit's hard to say what that will become like like a year ago, this businesslooked completely different. The whole market and landscape was just takingoff and like it's all such new technology, new marketing, neweverything that, like I don't even know what it's going to. Look like exactlyin six months, but I se Tas changed drasticallyquickly. I think we can all test to that. I'm sure I sutly awesome, though, is the. Is there any sort of upcoming,interesting artist coming in the pipeline or collaborations and is theend? And I guess a tying on to that question is: is that going to continueto be the the General Focus Yche or is super er goingto kind of branch out from from that as an art space? So you know when you're talking about like that,the curation and stuff that's going on we're talking a lot about the blogging. The featuring and stuffis a big part of that. It's how you have a sort of gallery movel online. Idon't think that's going anywhere. I think that they're looking at high,very high quality and various select collaborations partnerships and thattypes of thing, but there's still a huge, and I mean huge focus onsupporting the artist supporting the royalties long term, getting goodartists on to the platform, a getting good collectors onto the platform,actually supporting the collectors and there's definitely a small down play of like corporatepartnerships and stuff, like those come absolutely secondary to the art, theartists and the collectors themselves. That power the platform Gorgei there going to be an explorationin earnest in terms of other forms of metathesis like gallery viewing. Youknow because going to the website- and you know scrolling through like it's asocial media side- is one thing you know and that's great, but I feel there's got to be deeper ways toexperience. Absolutely it, as you know, art as a gallery. Yeah absolutely, andwe were we just had a team out of the La art show that was featuring some ofthe nuts on the platform and trying to introduce the platform to more peoplein the traditional sense of like hey we're. You know this is a big art show,but k come take a look at some of this newer technology say: Look, look at theNF, take a look at the value and the types of things you can do on theplatform, because it sort of also expands traditional art in an awesomesort of way like you can't do threetened video art as like a paintingthat hangs on the wall. Unless it's you know it's already digital and you know,and then you have to power it with with some type of screen, which I know thereare companies looking into right now, making specific n FT screens I've seena couple things on twitter room and I forget the names of the companies, butI know that's a thing but like definitely feed on the ground at artshows at etherium conferences. We were just in Paris or for that as well. That's definitely something that'sCourt of a business as well, and definitely just that reaching out tothe commune the traditional art community and the FT community withinperson in vonts ink we're going to be like blown away when a R and starts to become more mainstream. I'd, say and you go intothese digital galleries and are able tobecause I get, if he's a blow up, because they're already digital rightand may be to have these three dorene things. You'll be able to like see them in a physical space as you'rewalking around and like almost interact with them in a way and having ownershipof that type of thing. or it really. It really draws you into amore a more surreal experience which which allowsyou, I guess from an art perspective, allows you to like experience the art in a much differentway. So, like I'm very much excited for that type of thing, and when you startto the couple that, with a a curation of like higher quality artand going to a gather and have a a like, a a real experience of like fine art ina digital sense is something that I think is on the horizon of this type of stuffand it's very interesting to see. And then, when you further couple that,with like the artists, actually getting...

...paid, not only for the original sale,but like a secondary market place like apercentage of secondary market place. Sales like you, have a higher potential of like an industry of art where theyreally artists can actually not be poverty stricken unless they hit it.Like it perfectly right. Absolutely like I said I question her, but it doesit gives it gives the artist a way to make a profitable business forthemselves because they can count the royalties of the secondary sailsforever on the block chain, because that's all handled by the smartcontracts you know and and from my perspectiveand like sorry, Debab, security and stuff. I kind of love it be because,like it takes like what I'm really hosting is the interface to those smartcontracts and half my infrastructure is just the ethereum blockchain in thecommunity at large, so like it makes, I always say like like I love workinghere, because it makes my job a lot easier. Now from a like. I don't knowwe all work in security and with some way ship perform release on this onthis on this particular episode, and I would have to agree with you from alike a a head of headier ity for status and knowing that a good portion ofinfrastructure is not is non custodial like I, don't haveto be responsible for other people's things, and we have this massive openpromises that work that has a high level of security. That is, makes my job significantly easer. Mostof what I end up, thinking about not Abe curious, if you feel the same way,is trying to make software that intuitivefor the user, so that they can make the right decision at the right time withthe information they have in fun of them and not so much like making thatdecision for them. How does that work? As super rare in terms of like makingsecurity decisions for the infrastructure you have to uphold? I mean it's always a tough balance of. We have to make sure that it'sexpensive enough to attack that that it's not worth it and that alwaysfactors heavily into our security decisions, but also like smartcontracts in and of themselves can have flats and- and sometimes those flawsare only exploitable with lots and lots and lots of money which you know. Thatalso comes comes down to our decision, making having regular security auditsand bug, bounty programs and stuff, like that, also factors into oursecurity strategy, and I would say that we are very careful when developing thecontracts with law, having long testing periods for features and things, and wedefinitely wouldn't over enable features in a way thatcould allow users themselves to make decisions on what goes into thecontracts that would actually make them easier to break into. Is there a part of your infrastructure,at least on the spar contract side that holds like the contracts whole lot ofmoney, because it feels as though like? If, if I'm thinking about it, naively that it's more of a transfer process-and you never actually hold on to money or pool money, much like you would,like you see, defied things to right most of the time and defy applications,you're pulling a bunch of money into a vault and then using that money to doother things were as Frina few market place. Is it's a market place fortransfer? You just provide the mechanism and never really hold on tothe assets. Is that how it works and that's correct and we get a tiny little little royaltythat comes to us, but ninety, five percent of it or so goes out, is justtransferred by the smart contracts and we don't actually touch it. It's I lovethe technology and, like I said, the Ethereum, blockchain and all, and Ireally believe in the space, because it's providing a lot more value to thecreators who are actually creating things. It's providing value to some ofthe people. The collectors who act as middle men in the future, like thecollector royalties, is a big launch for us very recently and and that's nowpossible on our on our sales set up and stuff, and that's it's really cool that you know I've seen single, struggling moms working atthings like you know, grocery store jobs and stuff like that who areartists on the side. Who've been able to to make a living off of their artnow and support their children and have a life that that's like way way better,and it's all it's all down to how that mechanism works and like they're nothaving to struggle as much because the market right now is fetching highprices for the rarity. There's a lot of collectors of the theory Um out therewho who are buying- and there are a lot of secondary transactions like thesecondary markets- huge actually see that, on the main one onthe on the main site, you have a couple staffs in the main site that show I gotis lost it e. Here we are so you...

...for one million earned by artists.Twenty six million secondary sales and average Resou value is six thousandeight hundred and forty two percent yeah, it's huge massive. What want like! Why is that?Why is that the case? You have any speculation on that. It's just people see the value in it. People likethere's a lot. You know you get a lot of the naysayers in the market or butlike I saw a really funny tweet a few weeks back or you know, like somebodytook a picture in the gift shop of the Louvre and like it was of posters ofthe Mona Lisa and some of the art there that you could like by to put on yourown wall. Like the you know, the reproduction prints or whatever andsays like oh no they're, stealing the FT business model or you can just get it cheaper and hangit on your wall anyway. But like the ownership supporting the artistslike there's a there's, a lot of things. That's enables that enables themetaverse experiences in the metaverse galleries, and it's just. I think it's going to continue to takethe world by surprise, and I think it's going to last a lot longer than anyone.You know on the normal news. Media would speculate at this time. That was kind of leading into my nextquestion would have been sort of sort of the growth of it and yeah thatthat tweet comment. I mean it's interesting because the economic modelwould actually incentivize people to share and get people to you know maketheir Aptam more note notable and it totally breaks down this idea of it. It blends copy left, and you know, an ownership in a veryinteresting way, because it's like yeah just you know I want it out there. Iwanted out there because then I you know me as an owner and anable to you know maybe make a profit on this as an asset. Butyou know if you're a real collector. It's you know it's really interesting.Yeah, like I've, also been an entrepreneur in the entrepreneurialcommunity for a long time, and one of the harder lessons I had to learn earlyon is that you know competition or sharing of an idea is really good,because the more people that make noise about something generally, the morepeople know about it and get excited about it, get into it like it grows themarket at large and you really need that effect in a lot of places and it'sthe same with nts. It's even the same with baseball cards like the the rarityof something or the ownership of the rarity of something is valuable andthat's that's been created in the NF space right now, especially especiallywith art like there are other use cases for Erce, twenty one and basically oneto one ownership tracking. You could say property deeds. There's likethere's a lot of things you could put on chain. If you wanted to yeah butcome as God, it's almost as if fps have just found a widow, monetized striveand effect yeah. I was going to say that, like yeah with any with any innovative technology or new use casefor any any technology, it usually starts off in a more playful or high value use case for forniche markets and use in for FTES. That's typically the form of likegaining an art right and then what that eends up doing is buildinginfrastructure and market places for facilitating the use of those thingsand right now, like it's very hard to understand. How do you like even for anF tes like for for our INF TS? I have one when I do with it all right, so I even personally because I'm a taker,you can see a broken down TV behind me, but, like I like building things andone of the things that I've considered building is just a it's like that. Iget something like a NF. It looks like a picture frame of a wall. That is veryyou know, high quality, good angle, good, doing angle, etcetera that justrotates through in a peace but like people like me, have already builtthese things in created businesses around them, which is theinfrastructure you need to then support artists actually doing this and thenmaking money off that right, because, like people want like that's, a reallycool thing to have in your house is a beautiful picture frame on your wallthat rotates through all the different kinds of art that you've created thatyou have like, and then you have solid ownership of and potential resell value,so you have well flocked up in it. Exactly that's a really cool thing.Just for the art industry, with the proliferation of Four K, H, d, r TVs,you know I mean there has been that maker space side of those kinds ofthings. It's all you know it's almost like. It feels very soon that, likethat, I as a act should be productized...

...and it's ability to actually maintainitself as an APP is supported by the FT market fell. Definitely so for some one. A highvalue like I was actually funny enough, but out of pure Circumlita circumstance,I was looking at Sam songs, new, like picture TV, I think it's called we're like they made the constructionof the TV. Actually look like like a beautiful picture frame that you can. You can do like you, have options onhow you have that picture frame so and then afect has a particular APP or likea mode called picture mode which then rotates through whatever pictures youput on it or there's a store of course, but, like you can imagine that that'sjust something that people have on their wall- and this is beautiful likeup to seventy five inch TV with an incredibly good picture.Quality of our and and instead of me choosing a piece of art, I can buy aframe and then choose the art based on the mood I'm in like a rotate throughthings. I can then make it. I can then just become like a passivecurator of art that I care about and probably at least make my money back ormake a profit on reselling it in a market whenever the time is right, likethat's something that, like even as like just a passive person, wouldprobably interest a lot of people, and I don't think that, like up until wehave the ways to actually use these things, does it become clear that onfare a thing and actually useful outside of like speculative markets and peoplelike, and I peelie when you read the news about nf ts or people questioningin it's usually negative or like. Why and then, then you look at just the art industryin general and most people ask why there too, and it's it's clear thatit's a serious industry where people love spending a lot of time and moneyand Oh yeah, a D and e. The social aspectand some of the tech AC best goes nuts, because not only could you curate ityourself, but keep in mind, that's in the Internet connected API connectedthing. You could curate your art based on the weather when it's rainy, itshows dark pieces when it's like there's so many options and there's somany hybrid markets to that integrate. With the traditional ar market I'veseen one to one pieces sell you broke up there, one to one Pecoscell. There t looks like I'd lost you for just a moment, but I was talkingabout the the hybrid markets, where I've seen Nof ts that have sold onsuper ear that actually come with a physical copy like an artist haspainted a physical painting scanned an extremely high resolution version of itmade that an aft and then, when the collector bought it, they mailed himthe painting or some. You know some of the uniqueexperiences in VR or a r or the metaverse things you can buy as at anft that you can see in the D, jackets and stuff that you can wear in a videogame. There's so many cool models for this actually have a comment regarding thatsomebody's watching alive were our reading. What we already saidhere, a lot of loves a lot of excitement from people or back yes,says: Yes, the digital, the advent of digital canvases displaying acollection will elevate. The look beyond the electronic show room styleof TV Skren. Of course it will and the digital canvases will be galleries inthe bed of verse, throw on Your Your Oculis or your magically, your whatever,and go look at something cool. Go! Look at a you know, even even the buildingsand the metaverse themselves that you could walk into in virtual reality canbe art in and of themselves, because you can design just about anything. I think what would be really the nextstep for those kinds of things are for simple ways: maybe to wallet connectthing, but, like you know, you have your wallet on your phone, you haveyour fps somewhere and then and then or maybe it's just grab an address and youcan just plug it in somewhere, but having that really smooth integrationto be able to show case it, because you know therewas in the early, I thousands we all remember those picture. You know thedigital picture, friends, they didn't do too well because the low resolution-and then people would just unplug them and then they just didn't, want them onand because the screens with go the screens are way better. Now you knowthat, like they can be on for a longer period of time at a and they're much more efficient as a asa thing. So this kind of stuff is totally likepossible and like just being able to just you know you jump into ver andthat you're sharing it. You know. Maybe it's a public park gallery and youPugin, you know you find a little space and you plug in your address, and youknow your and everyone's sharing their art and stuff like that, and it's justa conversation. Space like the those are those conversation. Spaces are alreadyhappening, you know, N, Vr and then to...

...you know, we see them kind of purposebuilt for events, but for to become more commonplace. Ithink is is is like a very real thing and especially with you know, Ar Chinlarger influences getting involved in the FT space. You know there wish to show case their art. You knowthere might be, and obviously they had it could be because they, some of itthey're really proud of. I mean you saw that that Lazy Com or whatever by by by Mark Cubans, I just turned intoway to showcase your at up peace. You know, I mean on one hand, yeah, and hehas a you know they would have an economicsense incentive to do so. They want to maybe be able to celve ther out ofpeace, but the ones that they think are just cool and they don't think they'regoing to make a profit on. They still want to be able to have a place to likelook at them that S. that's interesting, you know, so those kinds of behaviorsets is just a matter of you know having the infrastructure thatsends for people to use a D and making it popular for people to do it. Thatway, and that's only just going to drive the market further. I mean in my opinion,on that tangent too. I think the markets getting- maybe not as me- It'smaybe not quite there now, but it's definitely going to get to where youwill see niches pop up within that space to with like eating, compatibleart and eating screens, where it's all black and white and the maker you couldhave specific products just for that to where it's like, because because thoseare all TRA efficient, too they're very low power, they can be battery poweredmuch more easily for a lot longer, and I think you'll see a little niches popup like that, based on the technology limitations and the adaptability ofwhatever types of our to that type of screen. Interesting shifting to a bit more of a technicalquestion and since you're in charge ofinfrastructure for quite a bit how how does super rear feel about the proliferation of other chains andlayer tubes? Are you dedicated to staying on like layer one or how do you?How do you navigate even evaluating whether or not you should try andeither move or like go across and be on multiple chains? I think part of that. What I'll say is we definitely watchthe space like we're heavily involved in the blockchain community, and all of us areblack chain enthusiasts to some degree or another, and we are always aware ofthe new technologies and things popping up the markets going to dictate a lotof that and it's going to dictate. Whether because, like you know, if youhave a there, are other technologies that arepopping up on the Etherean blockchain that are made that make things with n FT possible that arealready on ethereum like and that'll that'll that'll always be aconsideration. There are better newer, Shinier things andwhether or not they see mass market adoption or whether or not we allow a hybrid pratorwill be more on the demands of what Argus and collectors need. Then, on youknow our own personal opinions at this point in time. The economics have that definitelydictate that to right, like we status felt this pretty heavily butare like the cost of what we would consider. An atomic the standard atomictransaction of a status user is significantly lower than someone who'sbuying and selling art. Like a grayer Ark got that right, so you may be like an industry like yours.If you, if you stay into the rear art industry, may be more resilient to something likehigher transaction fees, then something like a micro transaction model right but then again like theremay be use cases of NTS that allow for that demand. Small Street of paymentslike that that we had like no one could come up with yet Bush then may move themarket, and then your decision making a curious stuff like how valuables overtime like what use cases for an F, tes and art and like market places of our,have we not thought about yet that may blow up. If you have any like weirdthings that have come up in the process of people like talking to you aSuperber, I mean I lately have been. You know if, if you're looking atdifferent protocols and things, I think the art market in general and keep inmind like we're, not finding the gas fees or anything like that, we're justwe're sort of e the facilitator of the...

...contracts in the market place and allthat. So we aren't as concerned about the gas fees and stuff like that on atherium right now, because they aren't so astronomically high that the marketisn't tolerating it. Because you know the art has pretty high prices anywaysand it tends to be a small number compared to the sale prices that thecollector seem to have no problem paying the for the art and the artistsseem to have no problem getting enough royalties to make a profitable businessfor themselves. And that is definitely a consideration. Butyou know any of th two point o coming down the pipe with proof of of work.Instead of a there's proof of stay proof of work, I've now seen proof ofauthority and being trialed and there's a lot of things coming down that pipeone that we just don't know where they're going. So it's always open tonew technologies. That makes sense you know, and we try and stay openminded like we'll get a little technical here, because this is atechnical podcast like one of the things I'm trying to build.Is I'm trying to build off of container ization, so this would be things likeGoogle cloud run, Amazon, elastic containers and stuff like that, wherewe can abstract away some of the the infrastructure needs and focus onsecure, Doctor Container Micro services that do one sort of specialized thingthat are easy and and like making. It makes us a little more agilebecause we're abstracting away a lot of the management headaches of traditionalinfrastructure and even of like, let's say Cuberna Tis itself, so I'll, takecloud run as an example which is actually Cuberna. Is it's just Googlemanaged M Gubernatis over native and that's you know this space really lends itselfwell to stuff like that to which is, I find cool, because I'm aninfrastructure dork right now, which is like it's like as a sort ofone person helping all of the developers out and floating in between.I can build feature environments and I can build some of these cool things ontop of just containers, and I don't literally don't have to manage servers. It's amazing. I just have to managedoctor containers and health software flows into containers and gets deployed.It is really cool and hit's what it's just it's, it's apartially a consequence of being on the block chain and that being about youknow that that being let's say, half half the infrastructure. All thetransactions are happening on etherium, it's a network, it's not somethingwe're building it, something we're contributing to, and it's something kind of magical honestly, I kind of so we may want to helpelucidate this because, at my opinion, like the naive view of what a company,what blockchain company is, is a group of smart contracted elvers on a websiteright like so when you talk about managing infrastructure for companylike Super Rare? What is that back in like what is that? What is all thestuff that people don't think about when they think about a blockchain company?And this in the types of things that you have to maintain in a responsiblefor or like what is the risk associated with like what is the risk that superrare bears in terms of infrastructure? Like what happens? If you go away right, hit's, a great question, you know we're pretty comfortable with wherethat's out, because if we go away, the contract still exist. They exist on theexisting protocols and, like I kind of like, like there's very little risk tocollectors or user, something that not being able to publish on that samecontract in the future, because the contract wills continue to function,the technologies, their unchain, it's distributed. It's not centralized andlike it actually doesn't matter so like we have a heavy focus on. Obviously thesecurity side of things, because we're dealing with financial transactions andlike our biggest focus, is to keep those contracts as tightly knit as wecan to you know. We send them to more than onethird product party for for auditing with an independent view and we're verycareful as to features and things we roll out and the technologies thatpower those and were careful with the way those transactions happen butlike we are also using web. Three Dodo technologies here. We're using Wallaconnect reason that a mask or using these things, so that the transactionsare happening away from us too, and we can abstract away some of the risk bynot never handling the actual financial. We're onlyhandling the details of the financial transactions and the addresses goinginto the contract. Whereever signing anything, because I've also worked inan environment where we are holding wallets and we are holding lots ofTokens and we are issuing tokens and we are issuing user wallets and encryptingthings and signing things and it's a...

...much different animal. I, like the webthree dado distributed model a lot better, well that you also mentioned that formaintaining your own ips know, at least that is a pointerfor storage of the the image itself that connects to the address yeah and we're trying to keepthat as distributed as possible to there are other alternatives to Ip f usthat we have considered, and I again won't really spect. I don't willactually do in the future, but I think we're pretty happy with the set up. Wehave right now, yeah, it's one of those situations where, like in terms of the Ip fs situation likethere's, always a sits like a problem with persistence and and someone has tocare about a given item that stored on ips were deferred to be there, and sothat usually means someone's pinning it like. That's the terminology for itright, which means to like yeah, I'm holding it it's mine and then I'll I'llmake sure that anybody who wants it knows that they can reach it from meand then the more people that do that. The usually the lower the latency ofretrieving that given file is- and that is basically based on yourinfrastructure. Currently, unless someone decides to do that, becausethere's no incentives to do it other than someone wants through to the right workor like you would have maintained a high high level of quality of qualityservice to the people who are minting in f TS in your platform. So, hopefully,maybe one day, there's a justice, robust solution that has strongerguarantees around persistence so that an event that you do go away and, forsome reason, your ps to stops working. Those things are still there,regardless of like. I think that's this. The goal of web three companies in alot of ways is you don't need us like in the in the event that we go away arelike our like organization. Our physical, like group of people, decidesto dissolve or something you can still do this and the things that you've donein the past are going to go away to, and that's something that I think that,like is a very unique proposition to an inducer that traditional companies havea hard time doing, because, most of the time the maintenance or upkeep of agiven product relies on the company just to exist, and hopefully that, like,if you structure with through company in such a way that I e a company, canjust disappear or like they don't even need to be there in the F in the firstplace for like you to do by a prod from them, participate on the platform andnever have to care whether or not they exist. It's adding value to the users.It's at inconvenience to the users, it's at in community, the sersus, ahuge focus on community or to and social aspects and stuff like that,because, like it's really about the the art, the artist, the conversations inthe space and it's less about, like the the will we be around in fifty years orthose types of things and I'll even speak directly more directly to the IPSstuff. Yes, we're pinning that, but one of the Nice things about the art spacein particular, is it isn't those low value transactions of high fees, itshigh value transactions, which means, if you have very technical collectors,very technical artists. They are also motivated to host. I P fs notes and pinthose things to make latency close to them. You know more ideal for the viewingtheir own art and stuff like that, and and it is a distributed technology andit doesn't rely solely on us, but we can contribute to the space we cancontribute to the ethereum space. We can contribute to all these things tomake everything better for everyone, and I think we all love that and on theother side of the flip side of ips, you know the motivation and IPOs being. Iwant people to see this and more people hopefully want people to see. This is the pay to play game. Your you knowyour r weave your file coins stuff like that, but there is sometimes a highcost associated with that, but it is more motivating for all of the nodes tokeep it if there's again, financial incentive involved. So it's a space forwatching it's a space. We highly care about, we care about beinga blockchain and distributing all that stuff and, like, like, I said, we'revery happy with our set up right now, but we're always always going toconsider new things see how the market evolves and see what becomes both financially feasible, prudent, andall of that, where do you see this going like? Wheredo you see all the kind of n FT space devolving to like? How doesit? How does it then milled into the other stuff people are doing? Does likethe dead you have like you, like. You just sit here and wonder and thinkabout this things, and if you do like what like, what are your thoughts outit like this isn't about necessarily super rare, just like yeah, if he's ingeneral, it's such a it's such a cool...

...space and there's so many of thesedistributed technologies popping up- and I think you know you never really know what amarket's going to look like till it evolves. But, like I constantly wonderabout weird stuff, I had a thought the other day I was talking about Housedeeds the other day and like what, if like, what you could even get a hybridproject some day where you have like. Let's Say San Francisco, decides to putdeeds on the theory and Blockson and respect that or something like theypass the laws necessary to do that. You can have high historical houses, passing ownership that are also areprojects and enough themselves and come attached with ftes and other projectsand things that are like a package deal like. There's really weird niches casesthat can totally evolve and I think somebody somewhere is going to come upwith some really cool ones. That will surprise us. How far away do you think nd developers end or triple developers? Our Way are fromreally adopting FPS. I think, if I'm going to give my personalopinion here, I'm going to give it thirty to fifty years overall for thespace to really really mature and be a mainstream thing, as younger kids get more will say inDocrine, into the digital technologies and stuff like this, and it becomes away of life and the older generations who don't care or don't think about itkind of disappear. I think it'll be super super mainstream. Definitely intwenty to thirty years here, but that's that's my own personalspeculation and it's probably totally wrong think, but I think someof the things we're doing it status may not at number down a little bit, butthat's that's me being biased. I would think it is because, like some of these technologies are amazingand they have such cool use cases even less like you know, signing you know. So you take like Metamask or whatever, when you connect it to super, you connect Wallet Connector,whatever you get a prompt to sign things to sign in, like I love oursigning system, there's no there's no user name Password Combos, there's notwo factor, authentication stuff: IT'S ALL CRYPTO! You have to sign this tosign in and, like I haven't seen any in the security space, I haven't seen anyreports of users who have two factor authentication on being successfullyhacked like passwords. You can guess, but you bekeys ar are a much different animals signatures of signatures with digitalcrypto, wallets, yeah, mine's plugged in right now and like signatures with digital walts andthings there there. You know unless, unless you get fished out of your keys,they're almost impossible for most people to crack right now and I thinkwe'll see a lot of the web three doto stuff evolving to the security and thelaw in space for actual users to because once once that becomes lessnice and, like the you know, there's a lot of Nice people in the FT and cryptospace using web free and web wallets and stuff like that. Well, it connectedthere on a lot of like facebook. You know your average facebook user doesn't really have a metaa wallet ontheir phone. They don't have a ledger APP that can sign into wallet connectwith a physical device to have these things and they don't know they existor how to use them yet. But once that picks up- and we see the educationhappen, I think we'll see a lot of that be adopted yeah. I can an couldn't agree more. Imean I've said a thousand times on the various podcast that I've been on that,like one of the most important things that we've done with block chained webthree is get a bunch of Cryptographic, keys in the hands of a bunch of peopleand in a myriad of ways and getting them adapted to using them, whereas PGPfail pretty miserable at that right. We have game ified in a lot of ways orlike marketized, the concept of people using cryptographic, keys and newschemes that allow them to kind of authenticate themselves and justdrastically more secure ways supposed to pass for a onto three passid one tothree verses. You know just push this button, and just put this just justpush this button is way more secure and way way easier to use. Even you don'thave to remember it. You don't have to use a password manager like there's alot of positive things about that experience as long as there's enougheducation not to let people get fished because, like I've seen it on superare,there's a couple of artists and a couple of collectors that I've seenfall victim to fishing schemes that have have reported their their keysbeing stolen for one reason other you know somebody said they were going togive them an offline business contract and all of this stuff, and it ended upbeing a very you know, highly advanced...

...man scheme and, like those thingshappen so like that education also has to happen along with it, because resetting the traditional accounts for most websites is a lot easier thanresetting cryptographic, things that are already on chain and unsigned andstuff they're just kind of lost, and that is a that is one small downside to thedifference in in the new systems, but to gain something like to sign in,to wit, three is substantially just faster amazing. It's just so much lessfriction to do so. Well, I think that's a decent way ofwrap up the do you want to let people know kind of where to find you andsuper rare, an learn, more Butlin you guys for for hosting, andtalking to me, I have a blast. You can find me on social media at RYM, COL ONMON Social Media Platforms, Superari now Super Raro. I actually one of myfirst task super was getting rid of the DOZIO and switching over to the COM.You can find Super Aron, most social media at Super Rar, and I look forwardto seeing all of you online on social media and in themenever them me. You and all of those lakes arehappened to be in the description, because I guess so nice good job made ill. Thank you for coming the show andI look forward to seeing you guys grow. No, thank you also to Jay for forcoming in to the ECOT. Well, thank you for having me and talk to you soon. I'm sure yeah!Absolutely! If you guys want to talk in the future, I'm available T T.

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